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WTD: 360 Grille

Culinary treats with a 360-degree view

by Allison Law


The 360 Grille, perched 20 stories up atop the tower of the Marriott Shoals Hotel and Spa in Florence, lures guests with its commanding views of the scenic Tennessee Valley and Wilson Dam.

The aptly-named eatery is the state’s only rotating restaurant. Food and beverage director Garien Shelby, who’s also the executive chef, first came to the 360 Grille as a patron. He brought his wife for a sunset dinner, and it was “spectacular.”

“It completely took my breath away,” he says.

The speed is generally set to allow for a 3-4 course meal in one full rotation, which is about an hour to an hour and a half. Patrons seated near the windows get the full 360-degree view in one meal, but the speed is slow enough that the rotation is neither distracting nor scary. (Interior seats are stationary.)

Its views are unparalleled, for sure. But Shelby wants people to have a culinary as well as a visual experience.

It has always been a fine dining restaurant, but made the transition to a steakhouse about a year ago. Steaks are the anchor – the Grille gets fresh beef delivered two to three times a week – but the chefs tinker with Southern staples to create other signature dishes, which are often seasonal.

“Our fish and grits is a popular dish. Our braised bison short rib is popular. We take some of the Southern flavors and incorporate them in more upscale and versatile items,” Shelby says.

The heirloom tomato salad is a play on a caprese salad, with freshly fried mozzarella, a fig balsamic reduction and a spinach pesto, instead of the regular basil pesto. “We just try to play with the classics and present them in a more elegant way, and take fun risks on certain pieces of the dish.”

The dessert menu features a baked Alaska, but made with red velvet cake and cream cheese ice cream. The s’mores are made with a graham cracker tulipe, a sour cream fudge cake, marshmallow ice cream and a toffee ganache over the top. “It has all those flavors our customers are familiar with, but with an upscale twist.” 

The Spring Vegetable Frittata, on the Sunday brunch menu, features goat cheese, scallions and fresh vegetables.

The Grille also gets fresh seafood twice a week, and sources items locally when possible. For example, the butternut squash risotto features local squash.

In the last year, the Grille began a Sunday brunch, again with a seasonal menu. Among its most popular items is the chicken and waffles, which has become almost a staple in Southern restaurants. But the Grille uses a petit New York strip coated in rice flour, quick-fried to produce a crispy meat with a flavorful sauce.

It is fine dining – entrees are generally in the $20-$40 range – but there is a children’s menu, though with an upscale flair. The steak and frites, for example, is a petit filet with Parmesan fries.

The goal is not to have an intimidating menu, Shelby says. “We take our risks. But the goal is for our customers to look at the menu and be wowed, but also to be familiar with the things they see.”

The staff is trained to be able to answer any questions and explain ingredients or techniques that may be unfamiliar to guests. “Our menu is designed to have a conversation,” he says.