Eyes on the skies

Weatherman Spann remains fascinated by the mysteries of weather By Emmett Burnett In the fall of 1962, in Greenville, Alabama’s W.O. Parmer Elementary School, teacher Edna Earle Porterfield commanded the attention of first-grade students – except for one. A 6-year-old boy opted instead to gaze...
Alabama Living Magazine
By Emmett Burnett Rising 114 feet above Baldwin County, Rollin’ Thunder’s passengers can view the Gulf of Mexico all the way from Foley. But not for long. Within seconds, roller coaster fans plunge 56 mph through twisted paths, hairpin turns, and a harrowing straightway. Passengers disembarking...
Alabama Living Magazine
Southern Union State Community College celebrating 100 years of service By Katie Jackson When 51 young men and women arrived in Wadley, Ala., on Sept. 12, 1923, to start classes at a brand-new Bible college, they found a single partially constructed building on a red...
Alabama Living Magazine

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Photographer of veterans named GoFundMe hero Jeff Rease, a Birmingham photographer who created the WWII Portraits of Honor project, has been named a GoFundMe hero

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I remember back in September 2004. I was in Jacksonville, watching the Weather Channel, as Hurricane Ivan churned toward the Florida Panhandle. After landfall it was

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Columbiana’s Jonathan Harrison had the opportunity to show some love for his home state as a contestant on the first season of “Next Level Chef,”

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Food styling and photos by Brooke Echols Call them finger foods, tailgate treats,  or if you’re feeling fancy, canapes. Whatever you call them, any food

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A new approach to old-fashioned service By Mike Stedham Stepping into the Old Town Stock House restaurant in downtown Guntersville is like stepping back in

Electric Cooperatives

Since 1936 electric co-ops have built 2.5 million miles of power lines across rural America – long enough to reach from the earth to the moon five and a half times.

From booming suburbs to remote rural farming communities, Alabama’s electric cooperatives are energy providers and engines of economic development. Statewide, electric cooperatives serve more than 1 million Alabamians in their homes, businesses, farms and schools. Their coverage spans approximately 70% of Alabama’s landmass.

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Alabama Rural Electric Association (AREA)

National Rural Electric Cooperative Assocition (NRECA)

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September 2022

Eyes on the skies

Weatherman Spann remains fascinated by the mysteries of weather By Emmett Burnett In the fall of 1962, in Greenville, Alabama’s W.O. Parmer Elementary School, teacher

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